samhaist

Posts Tagged ‘the bible and the future’

Another great quote from Hoekema (You need to read this book)

In books, loving jesus, quotes, recommendations, theology, you need to read this book on February 13, 2010 at 2:21 pm

Boom.

“Being a citizen of the kingdom, therefore, means that we should see all of life and all fo reality in the light of the goal of the redemption of the cosmos. This implies, as Abraham Kuyper once said, that there is not a thumb-breadth of the universe about which Christ does not say, “It is mine.” This implies a Christian philosophy of history: all of history must be seen as the working out of God’s eternal purpose. This kingdom vision includes a Christian philosophy of culture: art and science reflect the glory of God and are therefore to be pursued for his praise. It also includes a Christian view of vocation: all callings are from God, and all that we do in everyday life is to be done to God’s praise, whether this be study, teaching, preaching, business, industry, or housework.”

Seriously folks, The Bible and the Future is a goldmine. Eschatology matters, and the more I think about what God has done, is doing, and is going to do in history, the more I’m led to worship.

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Anthony Hoekema on total cosmic renewal

In books, loving jesus, music, quotes, theology on February 5, 2010 at 2:30 pm

First of all, Patty Griffin’s new albumĀ Downtown Church is great and you should go buy it right now. Second of all, in doing some reading for my Eschatology class, I came across this excellent quote from my good friend Anthony Hoekema (He’s not really my good friend, but if he were still alive and teaching at Calvin Seminary, I’d say we’d probably be buds) inĀ The Bible and the Future.

While Jesus dying on the cross in our place for our sins is certainly the blazing center of the gospel, many of my fellow evangelicals leave it at just that, forgetting the essential eschatalogical hope of the redemption of the entire cosmos.

“Fully to understand the meaning of history, therefore, we must see God’s redemption in cosmic dimensions. Since the expression ‘heaven and earth’ is a biblical description of the entire cosmos, we may say that the goal of redemption is nothing less than the renewal of the entire cosmos, of what present-day scientists call the universe. Since man’s fall into sin affected not only himself but the rest of creation (see Genesis 3:17-18; Rom. 8:19-23), redemption from sin must also involve the totality of God’s creation.”